Accessibility at SacPride

SacPride is dedicated to ensuring that all our guests experience a wonderful weekend. To make this possible, we have designed SacPride to be as a accessible to everyone as possible. If you have general questions regarding accessibility, please contact the Annual and Corporate Giving Director, Lanz Nalagan at lanz.nalagan@saccenter.org or fill out the form below!

Accessibility at the SacPride March:

Date: June 9, 2019

Time: 11am-12:30pm

Location: We will begin the march at Southside Park, head east on T Street and then turn left at 10th, going north until the capitol where we will finish!

Grand Stands location: Roosevelt Park at the corner of P and 10th!

There will be seating reserved near the grand stands.

Please note: seating is on a first come, first serve basis. The area is reserved for the following:

  • Senior Citizens
  • Guests with disabilities and their companions
  • Guests who need sign language interpreters

Sign Language Interpreters

Interpreters will be provided near the grand stands.

Accessibility at the SacPride Festival:

Date: June 8 and 9, 2019

Time: 11am to 5pm both days

Location: 300 to 700 Block on Capitol Mall

All entrance gates will have ADA accessible lines to avoid waiting. Please make your way to the front gate and let the volunteer know that you wish to purchase a ticket or pre-purchase your ticket online.

Accessible Senior Seating: This year Pride will have a tented Accessible/Senior seating area. This is located at 4th street on the north side of the street. There is another seating area near the Stonewall Pavilion. This is located on the 600 median.

There will also be sectioned areas near the mainstage. It will be to the right of the stage with volunteers to ensure that only those in need are using the space. Please note: seating is on a first come, first serve basis.

Please note: seating is on a first come, first serve basis. The area is reserved for the following:

  • Senior Citizens
  • Guests with disabilities and their companions
  • Guests who need sign language interpreters
  • Access will be given to service dogs

There are areas in the festival that will have additional seating and shade if needed:

The Center Tent at 500 Median Block

Stonewall Pavilion at 600 Median Block

Calming Tent at South side of 4th Street

Sign Language Interpreters

Interpreters will be provided at the following locations:

  • Thunder Valley Pride Stage on Saturday and Sunday
  • Stonewall Pavilion on Saturday and Sunday
  • Request an interpreter at the Center booth for your assistance when visiting booths

Frequently Asked Questions

I need an ASL interpreter in order to attend SacPride!

If you need an ASL Interpreter to fully participate SacPride events open to the public, please put in your request at least one week prior to the event. Email all requests to lanz.nalagan@saccenter.org. Cancel at least twenty-four hours prior to the event if you are unable to attend. Pride is charged if we do not cancel the interpreter with at least twenty-four hours notice. Please be on time if you have requested an interpreter. Interpreters will wait twenty minutes after an event’s start time, and if the person requesting the service has not arrived, the interpreter will leave. Note that Pride will still be charged the full cost.

What is a service animal?

Service animals perform tasks for their handlers related to the individual’s specific disability. The person does not need to have a physical disability to have a qualified service dog. Dogs that are exclusively emotional support dogs, however, are not trained to perform a specific task related to a disability. Instead, they benefit a person with a disability simply by the unique nature of the bond between canine and human. Such dogs are not legally granted the same rights as service dogs. Recognizing that some individuals with certain disabilities may need their canine companion to fully participate in events at SacPride, SacPride will admit an emotional support dog that has documentation of the role they play in their handler’s life.

Beyond affordability, we are striving to create a more physically accessible space for attendees of all abilities including, but not limited to:

o Creating a high-contrast website for better visibility

o Website free of flash and animation

o Using mindful and inclusive/affirming language on the website and promotional material

o Providing online content in both English and Spanish

o Providing ADA-accessible details online: https://sacramentopride.org/accessibility-at-sacpride/

o Provide a disability orientation session for staff and volunteers prior to SacPride so they can address any needs or concerns onsite

o FREE Signs of Pride Rent-an-interpreter service on-site

o ASL interpreters (Signs of Pride) on the main stage

o ADA restrooms across the Festival grounds

o Designated ADA seating and space at each of the stages

o ADA parking at the Festival grounds

o Communication encouraging each contingent in the March to have those folks with disabilities to lead their group as pace-setters and to increase their presence and visibility

o A quieter, scent-free, calming tent at the festival for those that would like to step out of the overstimulating experiences at the Festival

Thank you!

Our thanks to everyone who works diligently to make all that SacPride does accessible to everyone in the LGBT family. From Pride’s staff to our legions of volunteers, both during our June celebrations and throughout the year, everyone has shown a commitment to include all our community members by dedicating their time and talents to our efforts. All that we do would not be possible without these individuals, and we appreciate each and every one. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at lanz.nalagan@saccenter.org.

Our thanks to everyone who works diligently to make all that SacPride does accessible to everyone in the LGBT family. From Pride’s staff to our legions of volunteers, both during our June celebrations and throughout the year, everyone has shown a commitment to include all our community members by dedicating their time and talents to our efforts. All that we do would not be possible without these individuals, and we appreciate each and every one. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at lanz.nalagan@saccenter.org.

Sacramento Pride: A Legacy of Stonewall, grounded in a revolution alive today.

Many people are familiar with the police raid at the Stonewall Inn in 1969 credited with igniting a revolution for LGBTQ+ equality. Transgender women, queer folks, and drag queens fought back against the pervasive harassment and abuse they endured on a daily basis living in the Village of New York City. Lesser known, but predating Stonewall by two years, at the Black Cat tavern in Los Angeles plainclothes LAPD officers infiltrated the bar and beat patrons, arrested 14 people charged with lewd conduct for same-sex kissing on New Year’s Day 1967.[1] On Feb. 11, 1967, protesters took a bold step for that era and grabbed their picket signs, publicly protesting the police raid outside the bar.

Sadly, the abuse by police, discrimination, and inequality has continued across America for decades. On March 11, 1979, Sacramento police raided the Upstairs/Downstairs, a gay disco located at 1225 K Street (previously known as Hickory House and the Underground Shingle), requesting identification from each patron but not disclosing any offense committed by the bar. The next night, police returned to check whether the bar was violating its alcohol license, which was limited to beer and wine only. Police opened every bottle in the building to check them for liquor, effectively destroying the bar’s stock of beer and wine.[2]

A few months later on June 17, 1979, the first Pride March in Sacramento commemorating the Stonewall Riots of 1969 took place with the theme It’s About Time. Community members marched through downtown and ended on the steps of the State Capitol, a prominent public forum in the fight for civil rights and activism. Participants recall that the event was half activism and half celebration, both a demonstration of how the community had come, but also highlighting the barriers that had yet to be crossed.  The first Lambda Freedom Fair, later known as Sacramento Pride Festival, was held in 1989 with 16 exhibitors and approximately 700 people at McKinley Park. The festival later moved to Southside Park and the annual march dissipated.  By the late-2000’s, the festival had outgrown a neighborhood park, the fight for marriage equality raged at the ballot box, and the community demanded greater visibility. In 2010, the Pride committee moved the festival to Capitol Mall and the Pride Parade began to regain popularity drawing crowds in the thousands.

Throughout its 30+ year history some common misconceptions about Sacramento Pride have developed.  Most people know that the Sacramento LGBT Community Center organizes Pride and many believe it is a big fundraiser for the Center. The reality is that for many years, Pride did provide significant supplemental income for the Center’s year-round community programming, but over the past three decades as the footprint and attendance have grown significantly and the cost to produce Pride has grown exponentially, it often just breaking even financially. Today Pride represents less than 10% of the Center’s total income annually before expenses. Any net revenue is still invested back into Pride and other year-round community building programs. Also, while the Center has paid an events manager to coordinate the massive undertaking for the past 10 years, the event is still largely driven by a committee of local community members and staffed the weekend of Pride by legions of volunteers and we are always looking for more community members to help. If you are interested in joining the community effort, please volunteers@saccenter.org.

We believe there is always room for improvement and the Pride Committee solicits feedback annually through satisfaction surveys to ensure the events remain community driven and continuously improve. In addition to the annual survey, this year we also invested in future visioning to identify major changes that could improve the Pride experience and support the movement for equality and justice that it supports long-term. We sent out a future-oriented survey, held six focus groups, and met individually with stakeholders ranging from faith community leaders and youth to exhibitors and contractors.  Much of the input confirmed some of what we’ve heard in previous years, but also shed light on the focus of activism and inclusion we should look forward to with Pride going forward.


[1] https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-silver-lake-black-cat-lgbtq-20170208-story.html

[2] https://sacramentopress.com/2013/06/30/sacramentos-early-gay-pride-parades/